High Maintenance Job Seeker

The high maintenance jobseeker views the job search process and interviewing as a highly competitive structured process that should run at a clip. Many try to force things and cross over into Jobseeker Uptighterati territory, in an attempt to get an edge over other job seekers.

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Recognizing the High Maintenance Uptighterati Jobseeker in yourself:

1.      In addition to applying to the job online, the high maintenance jobseeker sends their resume or project samples to Human Resources and the Hiring Manager by the next day post.

2.      Many job seekers use colorful paper or ink or graphics in their online resume in an attempt to stand out.  This may render a fair portion of the resume unreadable and look ever so slightly like a craft project gone wrong.

3.      Once contacted for an interview, they need to think about it, research, or look at their schedule. Then bombard the recruiter or manager with a series of “I would like to know emails” or calls before setting up or attending the interview.

4.      Resist your tendency to be a Uptighterati by showing up half an hour early for the interview to see if the manager is available and can meet with you a bit earlier. Adhering to your punctuality principle, then trying to make reality conform to it, can be very annoying to others.

5.      The high maintenance jobseeker brings a series of show-and-tell items, awards, projects, reference letters, etc., to the interview and constantly interrupts the interview to show the items.

6.      Is accompanied to the interview by a friend, who sits glumly in the lobby, or worse, wanders around, peering into the interview room or other offices.

In an attempt to stand out from other candidates, many jobseekers inadvertently commit one or more of these interview mistakes. Qualified for a position, had the first interview you are not asked back for a second interview? Check the items above. Did you commit any of these blunders?  Have you turned into a High Maintenance Uptighterati Jobseeker?

Mediocrity is cunning: it can disguise itself as achievement.

Being second rate is not simply the curse of being an over-promoted underachiever – it’s the default state of the universe

slipperyroadlarge80 In the early years of the last century, Spanish philosopher José Ortega y Gasset proposed a solution to society’s ills that still strikes me as ingenious, in a deranged way. He argued that all public sector workers from the top down (though, come to think of it, why not everyone else, too?) should be demoted to the level beneath their current job.

His reasoning foreshadowed the Peter Principle: in hierarchies, people “rise to their level of incompetence”. Do your job well, and you’re rewarded with promotion, until you reach a job you’re less good at, where you remain.

In a recent book, The Hard Thing About Hard Things, the tech investor Ben Horowitz adds a twist: “The Law of Crappy People”. As soon as someone on a given rung at a company gets as good as the worst person the next rung up, he or she may expect a promotion.

Yet, if it’s granted, the firm’s talent levels will gradually slide downhill. No one person need be peculiarly crappy for this to occur; bureaucracies just tend to be crappier than the sum of their parts.

Yet it’s wrong to think of these pitfalls as restricted to organizations. There’s a case to be made that the gravitational pull of the mediocre affects all life – as John Stuart Mill put it, that “the general tendency of things throughout the world is to render mediocrity the ascendant power among mankind”.

True, it’s most obvious in the workplace (hence the observation that “a meeting moves at the pace of the slowest mind in the room”), but the broader point is that in any domain – work, love, friendship, health – crappy solutions crowd out good ones time after time, so long as they’re not so bad as to destroy the system.

People and organizations hit plateau not because they couldn’t do better, but because a plateau is a tolerable, even comfortable place. Even evolution – life itself! – is all about mediocrity. “Survival of the fittest” isn’t a progression towards greatness; it just means the survival of the sufficiently non-terrible.

And mediocrity is cunning: it can disguise itself as achievement. The cliché of a “mediocre” worker is a Dilbert-esque manager with little to do. But as Greg McKeown notes, in his book Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit Of Less the busyness of the go-getter can lead to mediocrity, too.

Throw yourself at every opportunity and you’ll end up doing unimportant stuff – and badly. You can’t fight this with motivational tricks or cheesy mission statements: you need a discipline, a rule you apply daily, to counter the pull of the sub-par.

For a company, that might mean stricter, more objective promotion policies. For the over-busy person, there’s McKeown’s “90% Rule” – when considering an option, ask: does it score at least 9/10 on some relevant criterion? If not, say no. (Ideally, that criterion is: “Is this fulfilling?”, but the rule still works if it’s “Does this pay the bills?”)

Mediocrity is no mere character flaw, but a deep tendency of the universe, to be ceaselessly fought, with no hope of final victory. Sorry, I don’t make the rules.

Read entire article by: Oliver Burkeman | Beware the gravitational pull of mediocrity | The Guardian

Happy New Year

  WISHING YOU A HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

To Our Friends and Customers,

We wish you a new year full of happiness and good fortune.

Last year was an expansion year for us, full of interesting lessons, new business lines and partnerships.

We look forward to 2019 and the success it will bring, and we wish the same to our business partners, friends and customers as well.

May endless joy and happiness be with you throughout the New Year…

From, all of us at FPSelectJobs.com
For some of the best jobs anywhere!!!

How to beat the Holiday Job Search blues

Job search during the holiday season can add an additional level of stress to an already stressful time of year.  But there is an upside to interviewing during the holidays.

With over 20% of job seekers opting out of job searching due to the holidays a fifth of your competition just left the market, and an even larger percentage fail to update their resumes and profiles on the job search engines. So now is the time to capitalize on that advantage.

Here’s why job hunting during the holidays, is such a brilliant idea!!

  • Create complete job applications. Resist the urge to send a blind resume, employers seeking to hire are more likely to view resumes in an online format that they are accustomed to, the rest is for the delete button.
  • Please follow the job application instructions. To ignore directions tells the manager that you do not/will not follow directions – and you wonder why they have not called on your resume!
  • If you have created a job application more than three months ago, please go back in and update, better yet create a new resume or profile, you may have fallen to Resume 1005 – nobody reads that many!
  • Most job boards allow you to add up to three resumes/profiles. Every now and again, update to rise to the top.
  • Change or remove your objective or summary so your info looks new.
  • Take a good attitude and lots of business cards to holiday functions. Hint: do not hand out your resume at holiday functions, offer to email it the next day.
  • Still no hits or interviews after three weeks – thrash the whole thing. Create a new resume or profile. Do it yourself or invest in your career, have a professional resume writer design it for you.
  • Some of the best salary offers are made during this upbeat time of year – so hang in there!!.

Visit us often at FPSelectjobs.com, new jobs are added daily.

This Article is a re-post from FPSelectJobsblog 12/03/2017 

High-Status Absent-Mindedness

High-status absent-mindedness – always seems to end up benefiting the absent-minded person.

What makes this form of forgetfulness uniquely annoying is that you’re not even supposed to be annoyed by it: the absent-minded professor can fail to show up for an appointment, or forget he owes you money, and the world “treats it as though it were cute, and possibly a sign of genius”. He’s not just allowed to neglect duties the rest of us feel obliged to observe, he’s also rewarded for it.

And, on closer inspection, as University of Toronto philosopher, Joseph Heath wrote a while back on the Canadian blog In Due Course notes, this trait – let’s call it high-status absent-mindedness – exhibits some curious features.  High-status absent-mindedness ssomehow always seems to end up benefiting the absent-minded person.

If someone were straightforwardly bad at retaining information about their daily activities, you might expect them to show up early for meetings, sometimes, rather than late; they’d forget you owed them money as often as the other way round.

But that never happens, leading Heath to speculate that what’s going on here is really a form of “male dominance behavior”. You act as though you’re too important to concern yourself with trifling matters to demonstrate that you can get away with doing so. And, by cloaking your obnoxiousness in absent-mindedness, you don’t even have to admit you’re being a jerk.

There are echoes here of “strategic incompetence”, the aptly named tactic whereby people exempt themselves from tedious chores such as stacking the dishwasher or clearing paper jams at the office, by performing them so terribly, they’re never asked again. Unlike strategic incompetence, however, high-status absent-mindedness needn’t be conscious.

Sigmund Freud argued that this kind of “motivated forgetting” was a way of expressing unconscious antipathy to others in a form acceptable to the conscious mind. And the evolutionary biologist Robert Trivers shows how natural selection has made us excellent at self-deception, because the best way to deceive others – in this case, to trick them into thinking you’re simply too preoccupied with big ideas to have brain space for minor obligations – is often to deceive yourself first.

That way, when you perform the part of the scatterbrained genius who can’t help himself, you get to be completely sincere and thereby more convincing. Or, to put it another way: your forgetfulness may be a status-boosting act, but you’ve forgotten you know that.