Being laid off or fired can be a shock.

For some people, being laid off or fired leaves them feeling angry, ashamed, or resentful. For others, the response could be, “Well, that was interesting. Time to move on. NEXT!”

But remember how quickly you bounce back and begin to represent yourself and your expertise as valuable to another company is always going to be your choice. 

A fast recovery depends on how quickly you accept that while you have had done interesting work, it is time to move on to better things. So, give yourself space to work through your feelings. Don’t let this setback diminish your pride in your otherwise successful career.

Put your redundancy package in perspective. Does it allow you to survive in the near future, or are you stranded? When your career game is interrupted, middle inning, it helps to remember that the sun is shining elsewhere, it is not raining everywhere, and you should remember to let that sink in.

Here are some other survival tips:

1.  Although a quick bounce-back might be a struggle, you will need to project a positive image to persuade your friends and potential employers that you are still in one piece. Focus on the highlights and achievements in your career. That helps to minimize the emotional fallout.

2. A layoff might free you up to explore a new career path or reassess your strengths, values, or where your career interests truly lie. Layoffs affect everyone in the department. Those who remain with the company quite often feel like they have just won the booby prize.

3.  Focus on your achievements in your former role. Use short and factual explanations. Too much detail can sound defensive rather than accepting of the situation.

4.  Laid off due to a merger, restructure, or downsizing? Use a broad brushstroke: Use all-encompassing language. “Unfortunately, I was laid off along with other colleagues.”

6.  Management change or a shift in direction: My skills and expertise are no longer aligned with the projects or the new manager’s priorities.

7.  Fired for performance reasons? Briefly explain the circumstances and what the experience has taught you. Then move on to what makes you a good match for the current position.

8.  Try to stay steady? Avoid responding to a deluge of jobs in a desperate attempt to get any new job. Instead, update your resume and shift your focus towards what you can offer.

Finally, accelerate your networking. The more active you are in your professional communities, the easier it will be to ask for and get help.

Thanks

https://franpatresumes.com/livechat

https://franklinpaterson.com
https://calendly.com/jp2look/franpat

Why Franklin Paterson Resumes uses a Resume Questionnaire

In response to your inquiries, regarding creating a resume appropriate to your skills, capabilities and potential, here is some useful information, about using the Frank Paterson Resume Questionnaire as the first step, towards creating a powerful keyword rich resume.

The Resume Questionnaire will have significant input into the data; you need to collect in drafting your new resume, identifying your skills, and accomplishments. It will help you to highlight your employment achievements; including relevant skills and achievements.

The Franklin Paterson Resume Questionnaire©™ will help you gather information about your work history, skills, education, specialized training, awards, and accomplishments; in a format that will allow you to describe the most important information about your skills, or experience in an easy free flow fashion.

We recommend that you complete it in your own time, then put it away for a day or two, re-read, make corrections or additions then sent it back. Use the Resume Questionnaire later for interview prep

1.) Review and fill out the Questionnaire in your own way using your own words; do not worry about tone, style, grammar etc. Take as much time as you need, leave out areas that do not apply.

2.) The filled out questionnaire will give a feel for how you would answer questions in an interview or business proposal meeting. The final resume has to reflect a bit of your style so it looks like YOU wrote it. It is also an excellent tool for prepping for an interview or meeting with a client!

3.) Once the questionnaire is completed, please return the complete document for review, update, and recommendations from your career Counsellor at Franklin Paterson Resumes.

4.) Set aside time to go over the Questionnaire via the phone to tease out skills, accomplishments etc., please set aside at least 30 minutes or more for this review.

5.) Your writer will craft your the questionnaire, and notes from the review review. Generally your writer will start writing the resume immediately, (within a day) of the review while all info is immediate and fresh.

6.) You will receive a draft of the resume for your review and comment. Once you send it back, your writer will make corrections and updates, and send your completed resume.

7.) Once invited to meet with someone to discuss a particular job or project, please let your writer know, and your writer will tweak the completed resume here and there to highlight areas of skill in your resume related the job or project.

About the Franklin Paterson Resume Questionnaire©™

We recommend that you complete it in your own time, then put it away for a day or two, re-read, make corrections or additions then sent it back. Use the Resume Questionnaire later for interview prepping.

Thanks,
Jpransom
Franklin Paterson Resumes
https://franklinpaterson.com

We don’t always need new distractions.

Do you love doing the same thing over and over? Here’s why it doesn’t make you boring – there’s a value to experiencing something more than once.

One of the less-noticed mysteries of human psychology is how many everyday activities we don’t seem to find boring.

If you have a favourite country walk, or you’re prone to listening to certain songs 20 times on repeat, you’d appear to be violating the principle of “hedonic adaptation”, which holds that, as pleasures grow familiar they stop delivering joy.

After all, evolution designed us to find novelty compelling – on the prehistoric savannah, new things posed more threats, and opportunities, than old – and the modern economy relentlessly exploits this fact. People who prefer repeat experiences are liable to incur disdain.

Maybe it’s forgivable, given the state of the news, that I’ve been re-rereading Sherlock Holmes recently, instead of current affairs, or cutting-edge literary fiction. But you probably wouldn’t say it was admirable. Ultimately, it feels like retreating from reality.Advertisement

So I was pleased to encounter new research by Ed O’Brien of the University of Chicago, which might prompt a rethink on the matter. O’Brien exposed people to new experiences (movies, museum visits, videogames) then asked some of them to predict how much they’d enjoy the same thing again, while others actually did do it again.

To cut a long study short: people enjoy repeat experiences more than they predict they will. And not because they use the sameness to lull themselves into a comfortable trance, but because they discover new things they’d missed first time around.

As O’Brien put it: “Doing something once may engender an inflated sense that one has now seen ‘it’, leaving people naive to the missed nuances remaining to enjoy.” It’s less a question of loving the familiar, then, than of discovering it wasn’t so familiar after all.

When you relate to everyday life in this spirit, you begin to grasp what the writer Sam Harris means when he says that “boredom is always just a lack of attention”. There’s always more to find in any experience, and boredom is simply what happens when, out of impatience or distraction, you stop looking for it.

And if breathing can be freshly interesting every time you do it, there’s no reason why a walk to the shop on the corner – let alone a hike in the hills – shouldn’t feel like the trip of a lifetime.

Read entire article by: Oliver Burkeman | Do you love doing the same thing over and over? The Guardian |